Archive for May, 2010

DAC Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

Friday, May 28th, 2010

About a week ago, I got an email from someone I know doing a story on how the Design Automation Conference has changed with respect to bloggers since the first EDA Bloggers Birds-of-a-Feather Session 2 years ago. I gave a thoughtful response and some of it ended up in the story, but I thought it would be nice to share my original full response with you.

Has your perception of the differences between bloggers and press changed since the first BOF?

Forget my perception; many of the press are now bloggers! I don’t mean that in a mean way and I understand that people losing their jobs is never a good thing. But I think the lines have blurred because we all find ourselves in similar positions now. It’s not just in EDA … many, if not most, journalists also have a blog that they write on the side.

Ultimately, I think either the traditional “press” or a blog is just a channel between someone with knowledge to people who want information they can trust. What determines trust is the reliability of the source. In thepast, the trust was endowed by the reputation of the publication. Now, weall have to earn that trust.

As for traditional investigative journalism (ala All the President’s Men) and reporting the facts (5 Ws), I think there is still a role for that, butmost readers are looking for insight, not jut the facts.

What do you think of DAC’s latest attempts to address these differences, e.g. Blog-sphere on the show floor, press room in the usual location?

Frankly, I’m not sure exactly what DAC is doing along these lines this year. Last year bloggers had very similar access as journalists to the press room and other facilities. It was nice to be able to find a quiet place to sit, but since most bloggers are not under deadline to file stories it is not as critical. Wireless technology is making a lot of this obsolete since we can pretty much work from anywhere. Still, having the snacks is nice :)

What does the future hold for blogging at DAC?

Two years ago, blogging was the “new thing” at DAC. Last year, blogging was mainstream and Twitter was the new thing. This year blogging will probably be old skool and there will be another “new thing”. For instance, I think we’re all aware and even involved in Synopsys’ radio show. This stuff moves so fast. So, I think the future at DAC is not so much for blogging, as it is for multiple channels of all kinds, controlled not only by “the media”, but also the vendors, independents, etc. Someone attending DAC will be able to use his wireless device to tap into many channels, some in real-time.

Next year, I predict that personalized and location aware services will be a bigger deal. When you come near a booth, you may get an invitation for a free demo or latte if your profile indicates you are a prospective customer. You’ll be able to hold up your device and see a “google goggles” like view of the show floor. You may even be able to tell who among your contacts is at the show and where they are. Who knows? It will be interesting.

harry the ASIC guy

Which Direction for EDA - 2D, 3D, or 360?

Sunday, May 23rd, 2010

2d3d360.JPGA hiker comes to a fork in the road and doesn’t know which way to go to reach his destination. Two men are at the fork, one of whom always tells the truth while the other always lies. The hiker doesn’t know which is which. He may ask one of the men only one question to find his way.

Which man does he ask, and what is the question?

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There’s been lots of discussion over the last month or 2 about the direction of EDA going forward. And I mean literally, the “direction” of EDA. Many semiconductor industry folks and proponents have been telling us to hold off on that obituary for 2D scaling and Moore’s law. Others have been doing quiet innovation in the technologies needed for 3D die and wafer stacks. And Cadence has recently unveiled its holistic 360 degree vision for EDA that has us developing apps first and silicon last.

I’ll examine each of these orthogonal directions in the next few posts. In this post, I’ll first examine the problem that is forcing us to make these choices.

The Problem

One of the great things about writing this blog is that I know that you all are very knowledgeable about the industry and technology and I don’t need to start with the basics. So I’ll just summarize them here for clarity:

  • Smaller semiconductor process geometries are getting more and more difficult to achieve and are challenging the semiconductor manufacturing equipment, the EDA tools, and even the physics. No doubt there have been and always will be innovations and breakthroughs that will move us forward, but we can no longer see clearly the path to the next 3 or 4 process geometries down the road. Even if you are one of the people who feels there is no end to the road, you’d have to admit that it certainly is getting steeper.
  • The costs to create fabs for these process nodes is increasing drastically, forcing consolidation in the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Some predict there will only be 3 or 4 fabs in a few years. This cost is passed on to the cost of the semiconductor device. Net cost per gate may not be rising, but the cost to ante up with a set of masks at a new node certainly is.
  • From a device physics and circuit design perspective, we are hitting a knee in the curve where lower geometries are not able to deliver on the full speed increases and power reductions achieved at larger nodes without new “tricks” being employed.
  • Despite these challenges, ICs are still growing in complexity and so are the development costs, some say as high as $100M. Many of these ICs are complex SoCs with analog and digital content, multiple processor cores, and several 3rd party IP blocks. Designing analog and digital circuits in the same process technology is not easy. The presence of embedded processors means that software and hardware have intersected and need to be developed harmoniously … no more throwing the hardware over-the-wall to software. And all this 3rd party IP means that our success is increasingly dependent on the quality of work of others that we have never met.
  • FPGAs are eating away at ASIC market share because of all the factors above. The break even quantity between ASIC and FPGA is increasing, which means more of the lower volume applications will choose FPGAs. Nonetheless, these FPGAs are still complex SoCs requiring similar verification methods as ASICs, including concurrent hardware and software development.

There are no doubt many other factors, but these are the critical ones in my mind. So, then, what does all this mean for semiconductor design and EDA?

At the risk of using a metaphor, many feel we are at a “fork-in-the-road”. One path leads straight ahead, continuing the 2D scaling with new process and circuit innovations. Another path leads straight up, moving Moore’s law into the 3D dimension with die stacks in order to cost effectively manage increasing complexity. And one path turns us 180 degrees around, asking us to look at the applications and software stack first and the semiconductor last. Certainly, 3 separate directions.

Which is the best path? Is there another path to move in? Perhaps a combination of these paths?

I’ll try to examine these questions in the next few posts. Next Post: Is 2D Scaling Really Dead or Just Mostly Dead?

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Answer to Riddle: Either man should be asked the following question: “If I were to ask you if this is the way I should go, would you say yes?” While asking the question, the hiker should be pointing at either of the directions going from the fork.

harry the ASIC guy