Posts Tagged ‘Blogging’

Brian Bailey on Unconventional Blogging

Tuesday, June 15th, 2010

bailey.jpg

(Photo courtesy Ron Ploof

I had the pleasure yesterday of interviewing Brian Bailey in the Synopsys Conversation Central Stage at DAC. We discussed his roots in verification working with the initial developers of digital simulation tools and his blogging experiences these past few years. There are, of course, even a few comments on the difference between journalists and bloggers ;)

You can listen to this half hour interview at the Synopsys Blog Talk Radio site. I’d be interested in your comments on the show and the format as well. It was pretty fun, especially in front of a live audience.

At 12:30 PDT today, I’ll be doing another interview on Security Standards for the Cloud. You can tune in live on your computer or mobile device by going to the main Synopsys Blog Talk Radio Page. So, even if you’re not here at DAC, you can still partake.

harry the ASIC guy

Where in the DAC is harry the ASIC guy?

Friday, June 11th, 2010

dac_logo.pngLast year’s Design Automation Conference was kind of quiet and dull, muted by the impact of the global recession with low attendance and just not a lot of real interesting new developments. This year looks very different; I’m actually having to make some tough choices of what sessions to attend. And with all the recent acquisitions by Cadence and Synopsys, the landscape is changing all around, which will make for some interesting discussion.

I’ll be at the conference Monday through Wednesday. As a rule, I try to keep half of my schedule open for meeting up with friends and colleagues and for the unexpected. So if you want to chat, hopefully we can find some time. Here are the public events that I have lined up:

Monday

10:30 - 11:00 My good friend Ron Ploof will interviewing Peggy Aycinena on the Synopsys Conversation Central stage, so I can’t miss that. They both ask tough questions so that one may get chippy. (Or you can participate remotely live here)

11:30 - 12:00 I’ll be on that same Synopsys Conversation Central stage interviewing Verification Consultant and Blogger Extraordinaire Brian Bailey. Audience questions are encouraged, so please come and participate. (Or you can participate remotely live here)

3:00 - 4:00 I’ll be at the Atrenta 3D Blogfest at their booth. It should be an interesting interactive discussion and a good chance to learn about one of the 3 directions EDA is moving in.

6:00 - Cadence is having a Beer for Bloggers event but I’m not sure where. For the record, beer does not necessarily mean I’ll write good things. (This event was canceled since there is the Denali party that night).

Tuesday

8:30 - 10:15 For the 2nd straight year, a large fab, Global Foundries (last year it was TSMC) will be presenting their ideas on how the semiconductor design ecosystem should change From Contract to Collaboration: Delivering a New Approach to Foundry

10:30 - 12:00 I’ll be at a panel discussion on EDA Challenges and Options: Investing for the Future. Wally Rhines is the lead panelist so it should be interesting as well.

12:30 - 1:00 I’ll be back at the Synopsys Conversation Central stage interviewing James Wendorf (IEEE) and Jeff Green (McAfee) about standards for cloud computing security, one of the hot topics.

Wednesday

10:30 - 11:30 I’ll be at the Starbucks outside the convention floor with Xuropa and Sigasi. We’ll be giving out Belgian Chocolate and invitations to use the Sigasi-Xilinx lab on Xuropa.

2:00 - 4:00 James Colgan, CEO of Xuropa, and representatives from Amazon, Synopsys, Cadence, Berkeley and Altera will be on a panel discussion on Does IC Design have a Future In the Cloud?. You know what I think!

This is my plan. Things might change. I hope I run into some of you there.

harry the ASIC guy

DAC Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

Friday, May 28th, 2010

About a week ago, I got an email from someone I know doing a story on how the Design Automation Conference has changed with respect to bloggers since the first EDA Bloggers Birds-of-a-Feather Session 2 years ago. I gave a thoughtful response and some of it ended up in the story, but I thought it would be nice to share my original full response with you.

Has your perception of the differences between bloggers and press changed since the first BOF?

Forget my perception; many of the press are now bloggers! I don’t mean that in a mean way and I understand that people losing their jobs is never a good thing. But I think the lines have blurred because we all find ourselves in similar positions now. It’s not just in EDA … many, if not most, journalists also have a blog that they write on the side.

Ultimately, I think either the traditional “press” or a blog is just a channel between someone with knowledge to people who want information they can trust. What determines trust is the reliability of the source. In thepast, the trust was endowed by the reputation of the publication. Now, weall have to earn that trust.

As for traditional investigative journalism (ala All the President’s Men) and reporting the facts (5 Ws), I think there is still a role for that, butmost readers are looking for insight, not jut the facts.

What do you think of DAC’s latest attempts to address these differences, e.g. Blog-sphere on the show floor, press room in the usual location?

Frankly, I’m not sure exactly what DAC is doing along these lines this year. Last year bloggers had very similar access as journalists to the press room and other facilities. It was nice to be able to find a quiet place to sit, but since most bloggers are not under deadline to file stories it is not as critical. Wireless technology is making a lot of this obsolete since we can pretty much work from anywhere. Still, having the snacks is nice :)

What does the future hold for blogging at DAC?

Two years ago, blogging was the “new thing” at DAC. Last year, blogging was mainstream and Twitter was the new thing. This year blogging will probably be old skool and there will be another “new thing”. For instance, I think we’re all aware and even involved in Synopsys’ radio show. This stuff moves so fast. So, I think the future at DAC is not so much for blogging, as it is for multiple channels of all kinds, controlled not only by “the media”, but also the vendors, independents, etc. Someone attending DAC will be able to use his wireless device to tap into many channels, some in real-time.

Next year, I predict that personalized and location aware services will be a bigger deal. When you come near a booth, you may get an invitation for a free demo or latte if your profile indicates you are a prospective customer. You’ll be able to hold up your device and see a “google goggles” like view of the show floor. You may even be able to tell who among your contacts is at the show and where they are. Who knows? It will be interesting.

harry the ASIC guy

The Accidental Blogger

Thursday, September 10th, 2009

As a kid, I always dreamed of being interviewed after hitting the game winning homerun or jump shot or throwing the game winning touchdown pass. Well, at this point in my life, the likelihood of those dreams is pretty much zilch. But, fortunately, I’ve been able to achieve something almost as great. A one-hour interview on Dee McCrorey’s Big Dreamers! The Reinvent Success Show.

Dee McCrorey

So, after a full weekend of watching college football and then NFL football, and listening to those other guys getting interviewed after the game winning touchdowns, you can sit down at 6pm PDT, and unwind as Dee McCrorey, Risk Guru, Innovation Catalyst, and Business Coach asks me about my career from no-name engineer to “Harry the ASIC Guy”. You can always listen to the recording afterward if the time is inconvenient, but if you tune in live you can actually call into the show and ask questions, make comments, remind me of the $10 I borrowed for lunch and never gave back, whatever.

Honestly, I’m both flattered and embarrassed to have this opportunity. I met Dee just this past July at DAC in the Synopsys Conversation Central booth and we hit it off right away. Even after the sessions were over, Dee stayed and continued to ask questions trying to dig deeper and get at the core the topics we were discussing. She really has a desire to get to the essence of things which is a great asset for an interviewer, so I’m looking forward to some tough questions. She also has a thriving consulting business helping professionals reinvent their careers, both within corporations and individually, so I’m looking forward to working with her professionally as well.

For more information on the show, you can go here. I hope you can join me.

harry the ASIC guy

Why I’m a Blogger and Not an EDA Idol

Tuesday, July 7th, 2009

(WARNING: What you are about to hear is very disturbing. You may want to remove any children, pets, or small farm animals before listening to the audio in this blog post. You’ve been warned.)

Several years ago, I was driving home from a family vacation when I accidentally speed dialed my boss on the cell phone. His voice mail picked up just as I was singing in the car to my daughter. I had no idea what had occurred until a month later at a staff meeting when he got up in from of my team and my colleagues and played this audio track.

Now you know why I am not trying to become the next EDA Idol at this year’s Design Automation Conference!

Top BloggerFortunately, there is another tongue-in-cheek contest that I am honored to be part of, EDA’s Next Top Blogger.

In case you can’t make DAC this year, I’d like to introduce you to the fellow nominees because they are all great writers and experts in their domains. I encourage you to read these blogs and subscribe to the ones that you find valuable. And look beyond this list because there are many more out there.

Colin Warwick is a Product Marketing Manager at Agilent EEsof EDA group. Colin’s Signal Integrity blog is about signal integrity tips, tricks, and tutorial for multigigabit/s chip-to-chip data links. It includes videos (technical and humorous), tutorial articles, interactive calculators and polls, reviews, and product and event information.

John Busco is a Design Implementation Manager at NVidia. Blogging since 2005, John’s Semi-Blog shares high quality news and opinion about semiconductors and EDA. John is hands-on working in the trenches on the bleeding edge designs, so you can trust what he tells you.

Paul McLellan  has been an executive in EDA and Semiconductors with companies like VLSI Technologies, Compass, Ambit, Cadence,and on and on. His EDA Graffiti blog covers EDA and semiconductor, looking back to some history, analyzing the industry and looking where things are likely to end up. I always walk away from Paul’s blog posts with something to think about.

Daniel Nenni is also an EDA industry veteran with similarly impressive credentials. Although his Silicon Valley Blog is fairly new, Daniel writes like a verteran blogger, sharing his 25+ years of experience in semiconductor design and manufacture in an entertaining manner. He manages to share some of his personal life observations as well.

Karen Bartleson is Director of Community Marketing at Synopsys. Since November 2007, she has presented news, insights, and opinions on the topic of EDA standards in her ever popular The Standards Game blog. Karen is also spearheading Synopsys’ Conversation Central at DAC where you can exchange ideas with many of these same top bloggers (and many more) about how social media is changing the media landscape.

Frank Schirrmeister is Director of Product Marketing and System-Level Solutions at Synopsys. His A View From The Top blog is dedicated to System-Level Design and Embedded Software and deals with the technology and business aspects to get us to ESL and the next abstraction level eventually!

JL Gray is a hands-on verification consultant at Verilab. In his Cool Verification blog, which set the standard for independent blogging in EDA, JL shares this thoughts on hardware verification, the EDA industry, and related topics. JL spearheaded the EDA Blogger Birds-of-a-Feather session at DAC last year and sits on the ever popular Accellera Verification IP Technical Subcommittee.

I have 2 favors to ask. First, please check out some these wonderful bloggers (and some of the others you can find on David Lin’s EDA Blog Roll) who devote their evenings and weekends writing for free (well, about half of us) to bring you valuable information you can’t get anywhere else. Then, show your support by voting for your favorite blog and telling a friend or a co-worker about all this great content out there. Please vote for whoever you want, but remember, if I lose, I might have to sing next year. And you don’t want that!

(Note: The Denali site requires you to enter a Captcha phrase and also your valid email address in order to ensure that people only vote once. The email address WILL NOT be used for any other purpose, so please do not be dissuaded from voting because of this).

harry the ASIC guy

Mentor Is Listening

Thursday, June 11th, 2009

My morning routine is pretty, well, routine.

Get up.  Wake the kids.

Check email.  Ask the kids to stop jumping on the couch.

Check Twitter. Tell the kids again to stop jumping on the couch.

Check my Google Reader. Glare at the kids with that “I’ve asked you for the last time” look.

You get the idea.

This Wednesday morning, somewhere in between conversations with my kids, walking the dog, and getting ready for work, I came across the following comment on a friend’s blog:

Ron, we are listening.

http://www.mentor.com/blogs

Ron Fuller
Web Manager, Mentor Graphics

For background, Ron Ploof is the guy who got the crazy idea almost 3 years ago that Synopsys should be doing something in this new world called social media. (Actually, I don’t think the term “social media” had even been coined back then). He evangelized this belief to the VP of Marketing at Synopsys and created for himself a job as Synopsys’ “New Media Evangelist” (actual title on his business card). He launched Synopsys’ first foray into social media, including podcasts, videos, and most prominently, blogs.

Synopsys’ success motivated Cadence to follow suit (something confided to me by Cadence’s former community manager). And it seems, according to the comment on Ron’s blog, it also motivated Mentor’s move into social media.

__________

I wanted to find out more about the Mentor blogs and I was able to set up some time to talk over lunch with Sonia Harrison at Mentor (see her sing at the Denali DAC party) . Sonia had helped me set up my previous interview with Paul Hofstadler and had extended me an invitation to attend the Mentor User2User conference (which, unfortunately, I could not attend). As it turns out, Sonia was the absolutely right person to talk to.

Even though I had only now become aware of Mentor blogs, Mentor had evidently coordinated their launch with the launch of their new website several months ago. Sonia was quite humble, but it seems that she was the driving force behind the blogs and Mentor’s presence in other social media like Twitter. She had been watching what was going on for some time, hesitant to jump in without a good plan, and now was the time.

According to Sonia, Mentor’s motivation for doing the blogs was to extend into a new media their “thought leadership” in the industry, to draw customers in to their website, and to exchange information with customers. Interestingly, Mentor did not hire an outside social media consultant or community manager like Cadence had. Rather, the project was homegrown. Sonia recruited various technical experts and others as bloggers. She developed “common sense” social media guidelines to make sure bloggers were informed of and played by social media rules (e.g. no sensitive or proprietary information, be polite, respect copyrights, give attribution).

According to Sonia, “one of the more difficult things was to get people to commit to blogging regularly. Writing takes time, it’s almost a full time job.” Despite this additional work burden, Mentor has no plans to bring in professional journalists as bloggers like Richard Goering at Cadence. And it doesn’t seem they need to. Simon Favre received a blog of the week award from System Level Design a few weeks ago, so they are doing quite well on their own.

Sonia does not have any specific measurable goals (page views, subscribers, etc.), which I think is a mistake, especially when her upper management comes asking for evidence that these efforts are paying off. My friend Ron likes to tell me that social media is the most measurable media ever and it’s a shame not to use the data.

I started playing with the site later in the afternoon and noticed a few things. First, when I added a comment to one of the blogs without registering, it did not show up right away, nor did I get a message that the comment was being moderated. It did show up later in the day, but it would be nice to at least be told that it was “awaiting moderation”. Still better, why moderate or require registration at all? The likelihood of getting inappropriate comments from engineering professionals is very low, and they can always be removed if need be. Moderation of comments will also kill a hot topic in its tracks. I’ve personally had the experience of publishing a new blog post late at night and waking up to several comments, some addressing other comments. Had I moderated the blog, none of those comments would have even showed up until later in the day.

Second, there was no way to enter a URL or blog address when leaving a comment. It is pretty standard practice to have this feature to allow readers to “check out” the person leaving the comment. Hopefully thay can add this.

On the positive side, the most important feature of a blog is the content and the content looks very good, especially the PCB blogs. Also, there is apparently no internal review or censorship of blog posts, so bloggers have the freedom to write whatever they want, within the social media guidelines of course.

 __________

It’s been almost 3 years since Ron made his first pitch to his manager. Who would have thought that the Big 3 and many others would have adopted social media in such a short time. Meanwhile, my kids are still jumping on the couch.

GTG

harry the ASIC guy

Journalists and Bloggers Face off at DAC

Thursday, June 12th, 2008

This evening was the first Blogging Birds of a feather session at DAC. It was a very interesting session, mostly involving discussions between the “real journalists” in the room and the other bloggers. John Ford has already posted a very good summary of the meeting on DFT Digest, so please click over there to find out more. I’m also interested to see what the “real press” has to say.

harry the ASIC guy

Bloggers Flock to DAC Birds-of-a-Feather Session

Friday, May 23rd, 2008


Every year on March 19th, the swallows wing their way back to San Juan Capistrano. Just up the road in Anaheim, designers from around the world will fly in for the 45th Annual Design Automation Conference, held June 8th - 13th. How appropriate will it be then, when EDA and ASIC design bloggers flock to the 1st annual DAC Birds-of-a-Feather session on blogging?

Perhaps you are a blogger or are thinking of becoming a blogger or know somebody who is a blogger. Perhaps you are a marketing director or just curious. Whatever your interest, you’ll want to come meet and engage with the bloggers who are growing in quantity, quality and industry influence:

This event will be held in Rooms 201B and 201C at the Anaheim convention center on Wednesday, June 11 at 6pm.

I am helping to coordinate this session, so if you are planning to attend, just drop a quick email to harry {at} theASICguy {dot} com so we can get an idea for how large a group we will have. If you are a blogger and would like to present or be part of a panel, please let me know as well.

I hope to see and meet many of you there.

harry the ASIC guy

Big DAC Attack

Tuesday, May 20th, 2008

OK … I’m registered to go to DAC for at least one day, maybe two. I’ll definitely be there on Tuesday and probably Wednesday evening for a Blogging “Birds-of-a-Feather” session that JL Gray is setting up. Besides hitting the forums and other activities, I’ll have about half a day to attack the exhibit floor or the “suites” to look at some new technology. If you want to meet up, drop me an email and we can arrange something.

Cadence won’t be there and I already talk to Synopsys and Mentor on a regular basis, so I’m planning on focusing on smaller companies with new technology. Here’s what’s on my list so far…

Nusym - They have some new “Path Tracing” technology that finds correlations between a constrained random testbench and hard-to-hit functional coverage points. With this knowledge, they claim to be able to modify the constraints to guide the simulation to hit the coverage points. The main benefit is in getting that last few % of functional coverage that can be difficult with unguided constrained random patterns.

Chip Estimate - Having been around for a few years and recently bought by Cadence, they are basically a portal where you can access 3rd party IP and use the information to do a rough chip floorplan. This allows you to estimate area, power, yield, etc. I’m real curious as to their business model and why Cadence bought them. At a minimum, it should be entertaining to see the hyper-competitive IP vendors present back-to-back at half hour intervals on the DAC floor.

I have a few others on my list, but there are so many small companies that it’s hard to go thru them all and decide what to see. That’s where I need your help.

What would you recommend seeing and why?