Posts Tagged ‘Cool Verification’

Why I’m a Blogger and Not an EDA Idol

Tuesday, July 7th, 2009

(WARNING: What you are about to hear is very disturbing. You may want to remove any children, pets, or small farm animals before listening to the audio in this blog post. You’ve been warned.)

Several years ago, I was driving home from a family vacation when I accidentally speed dialed my boss on the cell phone. His voice mail picked up just as I was singing in the car to my daughter. I had no idea what had occurred until a month later at a staff meeting when he got up in from of my team and my colleagues and played this audio track.

Now you know why I am not trying to become the next EDA Idol at this year’s Design Automation Conference!

Top BloggerFortunately, there is another tongue-in-cheek contest that I am honored to be part of, EDA’s Next Top Blogger.

In case you can’t make DAC this year, I’d like to introduce you to the fellow nominees because they are all great writers and experts in their domains. I encourage you to read these blogs and subscribe to the ones that you find valuable. And look beyond this list because there are many more out there.

Colin Warwick is a Product Marketing Manager at Agilent EEsof EDA group. Colin’s Signal Integrity blog is about signal integrity tips, tricks, and tutorial for multigigabit/s chip-to-chip data links. It includes videos (technical and humorous), tutorial articles, interactive calculators and polls, reviews, and product and event information.

John Busco is a Design Implementation Manager at NVidia. Blogging since 2005, John’s Semi-Blog shares high quality news and opinion about semiconductors and EDA. John is hands-on working in the trenches on the bleeding edge designs, so you can trust what he tells you.

Paul McLellan  has been an executive in EDA and Semiconductors with companies like VLSI Technologies, Compass, Ambit, Cadence,and on and on. His EDA Graffiti blog covers EDA and semiconductor, looking back to some history, analyzing the industry and looking where things are likely to end up. I always walk away from Paul’s blog posts with something to think about.

Daniel Nenni is also an EDA industry veteran with similarly impressive credentials. Although his Silicon Valley Blog is fairly new, Daniel writes like a verteran blogger, sharing his 25+ years of experience in semiconductor design and manufacture in an entertaining manner. He manages to share some of his personal life observations as well.

Karen Bartleson is Director of Community Marketing at Synopsys. Since November 2007, she has presented news, insights, and opinions on the topic of EDA standards in her ever popular The Standards Game blog. Karen is also spearheading Synopsys’ Conversation Central at DAC where you can exchange ideas with many of these same top bloggers (and many more) about how social media is changing the media landscape.

Frank Schirrmeister is Director of Product Marketing and System-Level Solutions at Synopsys. His A View From The Top blog is dedicated to System-Level Design and Embedded Software and deals with the technology and business aspects to get us to ESL and the next abstraction level eventually!

JL Gray is a hands-on verification consultant at Verilab. In his Cool Verification blog, which set the standard for independent blogging in EDA, JL shares this thoughts on hardware verification, the EDA industry, and related topics. JL spearheaded the EDA Blogger Birds-of-a-Feather session at DAC last year and sits on the ever popular Accellera Verification IP Technical Subcommittee.

I have 2 favors to ask. First, please check out some these wonderful bloggers (and some of the others you can find on David Lin’s EDA Blog Roll) who devote their evenings and weekends writing for free (well, about half of us) to bring you valuable information you can’t get anywhere else. Then, show your support by voting for your favorite blog and telling a friend or a co-worker about all this great content out there. Please vote for whoever you want, but remember, if I lose, I might have to sing next year. And you don’t want that!

(Note: The Denali site requires you to enter a Captcha phrase and also your valid email address in order to ensure that people only vote once. The email address WILL NOT be used for any other purpose, so please do not be dissuaded from voting because of this).

harry the ASIC guy

Setting The Record Straight

Thursday, February 19th, 2009

Since conducting the Verification Methodology Poll and publishing the raw results last week, I’ve been planning to follow up with a post that digs a little deeper into the numbers. Things have gotten rather busy in the meantime, both at work and with organizing the SaaS and Cloud Computing EDA Roundtable for next week at DVCon. So I’ve let it slip a little.

Well, I noticed today that the verification methodology poll was referenced in a Cadence blog post by Adam Sherer. The results were somewhat mis-interpreted (in my opinion), so that kicked my butt to post my own interpretations to set the record straight. Says Adam:

According to the poll conducted by Harry Gries in his Harry the ASIC Guy blog, you should go “all in” on the OVM because it is the 2:1 favorite.

In fact, the raw results had VMM with 80 users and OVM with 125 users, a ratio of just over 1.5:1 (1.5625 to be exact). So the 2:1 ratio is not accurate. However, if you add in RVM/Vera users to the VMM numbers, and then add in AVM, eRM, and e users to the OVM numbers, that ratio is more like 1.8:1. Closer, but still not 2:1.

It also indicates that my poll says that “you should go ‘all in’ on the OVM”. I never said that nor does the poll say anything about what you “should do”. The data simply captures what people are planning on using next. If you are inclined to follow the majority, then perhaps OVM is the way to go. By contrast, there is nothing in the poll comparing the technical merits of the various methodologies. So, if you are inclined to make up your own mind, then you have some work to do and my poll won’t help you on that. You’re probably better off visiting JL Gray at Cool Verification.

No poll is perfect and it will be interesting to compare to DVCon and John Cooley polls to see if they are consistent. Here are a few other interesting stats that I pulled out of the poll results:

  • 91% of respondents are using some sort of SystemVerilog methodology
  • 10% are using both OVM and VMM (although I suspect many of these are consultants)
  • 27% are still using e or Vera (more e than Vera)
  • 4% are using ONLY VHDL or Verilog (this number may be low due to the skew of respondents towards advanced methodologies)

Again, I welcome you to download the raw data, which you can find in PDF format and as an Excel workbook, and draw your own conclusions.

harry the ASIC guy

VMM on Questa & IUS Redux? Anything New Here?

Friday, December 5th, 2008

Considering what I’ve been hearing about the status of the Accellera VIP Subcommitee activity regarding OVM / VMM integration, I was rather surprised to see the following synchronized press releases from Mentor and Cadence yesterday:

As I understand, the Accellera VIP Subcommittee has just recently begun tackling the real crux issues regarding integrating the 2 methodologies such as:

  • Casting of disparate types
  • Synchronization of the simulation phases
  • Message reporting

My speculation is that Mentor and Cadence are just now formally announcing the availability of the “fixed up” VMM code that had previously leaked out in a blog post by JL Gray.

Does anyone out there know what’s really in this release? It would be good to hear directly from the vendors on this.

How about OVM on VCS? Has anybody been able to get that working?

harry the ASIC guy

Big DAC Attack

Tuesday, May 20th, 2008

OK … I’m registered to go to DAC for at least one day, maybe two. I’ll definitely be there on Tuesday and probably Wednesday evening for a Blogging “Birds-of-a-Feather” session that JL Gray is setting up. Besides hitting the forums and other activities, I’ll have about half a day to attack the exhibit floor or the “suites” to look at some new technology. If you want to meet up, drop me an email and we can arrange something.

Cadence won’t be there and I already talk to Synopsys and Mentor on a regular basis, so I’m planning on focusing on smaller companies with new technology. Here’s what’s on my list so far…

Nusym - They have some new “Path Tracing” technology that finds correlations between a constrained random testbench and hard-to-hit functional coverage points. With this knowledge, they claim to be able to modify the constraints to guide the simulation to hit the coverage points. The main benefit is in getting that last few % of functional coverage that can be difficult with unguided constrained random patterns.

Chip Estimate - Having been around for a few years and recently bought by Cadence, they are basically a portal where you can access 3rd party IP and use the information to do a rough chip floorplan. This allows you to estimate area, power, yield, etc. I’m real curious as to their business model and why Cadence bought them. At a minimum, it should be entertaining to see the hyper-competitive IP vendors present back-to-back at half hour intervals on the DAC floor.

I have a few others on my list, but there are so many small companies that it’s hard to go thru them all and decide what to see. That’s where I need your help.

What would you recommend seeing and why?

The Revolution Will Not Be Televised!!!

Thursday, April 3rd, 2008

My friend Ron has a knack for recognizing revolutionary technologies before most of us. He was one of the first to appreciate the power of the browser and how it would transform the internet, previously used only by engineers and scientists. He was one of the first and best podcasters. And now he’s become a self-proclaimed New Media Evangelist, preaching the good news of Web 2.0 and making it accessible to “the rest of us”.

Most of us are familiar with mainstream Web 2.0 applications, whether we use them or our friends use them or our kids use them. Social and professional networks such as My Space, Facebook, and LinkedIn. Podcasts in iTunes. Blogging sites on every topic. Virtual worlds such as Second Life. Collaboration tools such as Wikipedia. File sharing sites such as Youtube and Flickr. Social bookmarking sites such as Digg and Technorati. Open source publishing tools such as Wordpress and Joomla. Using these technologies we’re having conversations, collaborating, and getting smarter in ways that were unimaginable just 5 years ago. Imagine, a rock climber in Oregon can share climbing techniques with a fellow climber in Alice Springs. And mostly for free, save for the cost of the internet connection.

When we think of Web 2.0, we tend to think of teenagers and young adults. But this technology was invented by us geeks and so it’s no surprise that the ASIC design world is also getting on-board. Here are some examples from the ASIC Design industry:

Social media is networking ASIC designer to ASIC designer enabling us to be smarter faster. But that’s not all. Many forward looking companies have recognized the opportunity to talk to their customers directly. About 6 months ago, Synopsys launched several blogs on its microsite. Xilinx also has a User Community and a blog. It’s great that this is happening, but does it really make much of a difference? Consider what I believe could be a watershed event:

A few months ago, JL Grey published a post on his Cool Verification blog entitled The Brewing Standards War - Verification Methodology. As expected, verification engineers chimed in and expressed their ardent opinions and viewpoints. What came next was not expected … stakeholders from Synopsys and Mentor joined the conversation. The chief VMM developer from Synopsys, Janick Bergeron, put forth information to refute certain statements that he felt were erroneous. A marketing manager from Mentor, Dennis Brophy, offered his views on why OVM was open and VMM was not. And Karen Bartleson, who participates in several standards committees for Synopsys, disclosed Synopsys’ plan to encourage a single standard by donating VMM to Accellera.

From what I’ve heard, this was one of the most viewed ASIC related blog postings ever (JL: Do you have any stats you can share?). But did it make a difference in changing the behavior of any of the protagonists? I think it did and here is why:

  • This week at the Synopsys Users Group meeting in San Jose, the VMM / OVM issues were the main topic of questioning for CEO Aart DeGeus after his keynote address. And the questions picked up where they left off in the blog post…Will VMM ever be open and not just licensed? Is Synopsys trying to talk to Mentor and Cadence directly? If we have access to VMM, can we run it on other simulators besides VCS?
  • Speaking to several Synopsoids afterwards, I discovered that the verification marketing manager referenced this particular Cool Verification blog posting in an email to an internal Synopsys verification mailing list. It seems he approved of some of the comments and wanted to make others in Synopsys aware of these customer views. Evidently he sees these opinions as valuable and valid. Good for him.
  • Speaking to some at Synopsys who have a say in the future of VMM, I believe that Synopsys’ decision to donate VMM to Accellera has been influenced and pressured, at least in part, by the opinions expressed in the blog posting and the subsequent comments. Good for us.

I’d like to believe that the EDA companies and other suppliers are coming to recognize what mainstream companies have recognized … that the battle for customers is decreasingly being fought with advertisements, press releases, glossy brochures, and animated Power Point product pitches. Instead, as my friend Ron has pointed out, I am able to talk to “passionate content creators who know more about designing chips than any reporter could ever learn”, and find out what they think. Consider these paraphrased excerpts of the cluetrain manifesto : the end of business as usual:

  • The Internet is enabling conversations among human beings that were simply not possible in the era of mass media. As a result, markets are getting smarter, more informed, more organized.
  • People in networked markets have figured out that they get far better information and support from one another than from vendors.
  • There are no secrets. The networked market knows more than companies do about their own products. And whether the news is good or bad, they tell everyone.
  • Companies that don’t realize their markets are now networked person-to-person, getting smarter as a result and deeply joined in conversation are missing their best opportunity.
  • Companies can now communicate with their markets directly. If they blow it, it could be their last chance.

In short, this ASIC revolution will not be televised!!!

harry the ASIC guy