Posts Tagged ‘DVCon’

Winners and Losers

Sunday, March 6th, 2011

Washington General and Harlem Globetrotter at LAXEngineers tend to view the world in binary. There’s the good guys and the bad guys. There’s the right way and the wrong way. There are rich folks and poor folks. Democrats and Republicans. You’re with us or against us.

And there are winners and losers.

This week, working the Agnisys booth at DVCon, I got to see all these types and all the shades in between. I got to see the good guys (me, of course, and anyone who was with me) and the bad guys (the competition). I saw people doing things the right way (telling the truth, or close to the truth) and the wrong way (pure fabrications). I saw rich folks (CEOs in expensive suits and shoes) and poor folks (the guys at the hotel tearing down after the show). Most of the people from Silicon Valley were Democrats, I suppose, and many of the others were Republicans. And, of course, for the Big 3 EDA vendors, it was all about who was with them (on the EDA360 passport) or against them (everyone else).

But, when you look a little closer, you see a lot of shades in between. Personally, I knew people at almost every booth with whom I had worked before. They’re not good or bad, right or wrong, rich or poor, democrats or republicans, or with me or against me. They’re just old friends working in an industry they love on technology they are psyched about.

I actually had some foreshadowing of this as I was flying up to the conference. As I was passing through the metal detectors at LAX, I had noticed some tall gentlemen dressed in green warmup suits. Realizing it was a basketba,ll team, I curiously glanced at their logo and saw the name “Generals”. Later, I was able to get a full view of the name “Washington Generals”.

If you are not familiar, the Washington Generals are the basketball team that travels with the Harlem Globetrotters. They are perennial losers. The spoil and object of countless Globetrotter jokes. According to Wikipedia, the Generals lost over 13,000 games to the Globetrotters between 1953 and 1995, and won only 6 times. That’s a winning percentage of 0.0005! If anyone deserves the title of “Losers”, it’s the Washington Generals.

As I sat waiting for my flight, I noticed some other apparent basketball players dressed in red with white and blue trim. Could it be? Yes, they were the Globetrotters, winners of those same 13,000 games that the Generals had lost. If anyone deserves the ttle of “Winners”, it’s the Harlem Globetrotters.

What surprised me at the time was that these eternal rivals, Winners and Losers, were traveling together, joking and laughing like best friends. Although I know that they obviously travel together and they know eachother, for some reason I had expected them to be separated. The good guys and the bad guys. The Winners and the Losers.

Just as the Generals and Globetrotters are rivals on the court but friends off the court, these EDA veterans were rivals at the booths at DVCon but friends in the bar afterwards. The EDA industry is kind of like a professional sports league. Sure, the teams compete with eachother. But players move between teams all the time and most of the players are friends off the field. In the end, what’s most important is that the league grows and is successful.

Hopefully, going forward, EDA will be more like the NBA than one of these failed leagues.

harry the ASIC guy

The Burning Platform

Monday, March 1st, 2010

The Burning PlatformAlthough I was unable to attend DVCon last week, and I missed Jim Hogan and Paul McLellan presenting “So you want to start an EDA Company? Here’s how“, I was at least able to sit in on an interesting webinar offered by RTM Consulting entitled Achieving Breakthrough Customer Satisfaction through Project Excellence.

As you may recall, I wrote a previous blog post about a Consulting Soft Skills training curriculum developed by RTM in conjunction with Mentor Graphics for their consulting organization. Since that time, I’ve spoken on and off with RTM CEO Randy Mysliviec. During a recent conversation he made me aware of this webinar and offered one of the slots for me to attend. I figured it would be a good refresher, at a minimum, and if I came out of it with at least one new nugget or perspective, I was ahead of the game. So I accepted.

I decided to “live tweet” the seminar. That is to say, I posted tweets of anything interesting that I heard during the webinar, all using the hash tag #RTMConsulting. If you want to view the tweets from that webinar, go here.

After 15 years in the consulting biz, I certainly had learned a lot, and the webinar was indeed a good refresher on some of the basics of managing customer satisfaction. There was a lot of material for the 2 hours that we had, and there were no real breaks, so it was very dense and full of material. The only downside is that I wish there had been some more time for discussion or questions, but that’s really a minor nit to pick.

I did get a new insight out of the webinar, and so I guess I’m ahead of the game. I had never heard of the concept of the “burning platform” before, especially as applies to projects. The story goes that there was an oil rig in the North Sea that caught fire and was bound to be destroyed. One of the workers had to decide whether to stay on the rig or jump into the freezing waters. The fall might kill him and he’d face hypothermia within minutes if not rescued, but he decided to jump anyway, since probable death was better than certain death. According to the story, the man survived and was rescued. Happy ending.

The instructor observed that many projects are like burning platforms, destined for destruction unless radically rethought. In thinking back, I immediately thought of 2 projects I’d been involved with that turned out to be burning platforms.

The first was a situation where a design team was trying to reverse engineer an asynchronously designed processor in order to port it to another process. The motivation was that the processor (I think it was an ADSP 21 something or other) was being retired by the manufacturer and this company wanted to continue to use it nonetheless. We were called in when the project was already in trouble, significantly over budget and schedule and with no clear end in sight. After a few weeks of looking at the situation, we decided that there was no way they would ever be able to verify the timing and functionality of the ported design. We recommended that they kill this approach and start over with a standard processor core that could do the job. There was a lot of resistance, especially from the engineer whose idea it was to reverse engineer the existing processor. But, eventually the customer made the right choice and redesigned using an ARM core.

Another group at the same company also had a burning platform. They were on their 4th version of a particular chip and were still finding functional bugs. Each time they developed a test plan and executed it, there were still more bugs that they had missed. Clearly their verification methodology was outdated and insufficient, depending on directed tests and FPGA prototypes rather than more current measurable methods. We tried to convince them to use assertions, functional coverage, constrained random testing, etc. But they were convinced that they just had to fix the few known bugs and they’d be OK. From their perspective, it wasn’t worth all the time and effort to develop and execute a new plan. They never did take our recommendations and I lost track of that project. I wonder if they ever finished.

As I think about these 2 examples, I realize that “burning platform” projects have some characteristics in common. And they align with the 3 key elements of a project. To tell if you have a “burning platform” on your hands, you might ask yourself the following 3 questions:

  1. Scope - Are you spending more and more time every week managing issues and risks? Is the list growing, rather than shrinking?
  2. Schedule - Are you on a treadmill with regards to schedule? Do you update the schedule every month only to realize that the end date has moved out by a month, or more?
  3. Resources - Are the people that you respect the most trying to jump off of the project? Are people afraid to join you?

If you answered yes to at least 2 of these, then you probably have a burning platform project on your hands. It’s time to jump in the water. That is, it’s time to scrap the plan and rethink your project from a fresh perspective and come up with a new plan. Of course, this is not a very scientific way of identifying an untenable project, but I think it’s a good rule-of-thumb.

There are other insights that I had from the webinar, but I thought I’d only share just the one. I don’t know if this particular webinar was recorded, but there are 2 more upcoming that you can attend. If you do, please feel free to live tweet the event like I did, using the #RTMConsulting hash tag.

But please, no “flaming” :-)

harry the ASIC guy

So, you want to start an EDA company?

Tuesday, February 9th, 2010

www.flickr.com/photos/cayusa/ CC BY-NC 2.0Lightbulb

In the almost 2 years since I started this blog, I’ve been paying pretty close attention to the EDA industry. And one of the themes I keep hearing goes something like this:

“There’s no more innovation in EDA”
I hear it on blogs and on Twitter. I hear it from design engineers, from consultants, from old media, from new media, and even from EDA people.

One person I know, someone who has been an executive at an EDA company and a venture capitalist, says that EDA is persona non-grata for VC folks. Maybe you can start a “lifestyle company” doing EDA, but don’t expect any more companies like Synopsys to come along.

And then, about a month ago, I get an email from someone out of the blue. He’s got an idea for a new EDA tool that would transform the industry. He’s been in the semiconductor business. He’s developed EDA tools. He knows everybody there is to know. And he’s not able to get anyone’s attention. As he puts it, nobody is working on anything “disruptive”. They are all doing “incremental improvements” that are “woefully inadequate”.

I spent about an hour talking to him on the phone. As I got off the phone, I was not sure what to make of the conversation. He was either insane or a visionary. He was either deluded or optimistic. He was either obsessed or determined. I’m still not sure which.

And that is what makes this industry so much frickin’ fun! You never know. That crazy idea of turning VHDL into gate-level schematics … who figured that would be the biggest innovation in design in decades?

Then, last week, I heard about this event/gathering/workshop happening during DVCon at the San Jose Doubletree. Presented by EDA veterans Jim Hogan and Paul McLellan. It’s called “So, you want to start an EDA Company. Here’s how …” And I immediately thought of my new friend with the idea about a new EDA company. This is exactly what he was looking for … an audience of people with open minds who were asking “why not” instead of “why”.

Maybe you also have a crazy idea. Maybe it really is crazy. Or maybe not.

I invited him and I hope I can get there myself. If so, I think you might want to come too.  You might just meet the founder of the next Synopsys. Here’s the skinny: San Jose Doubletree on Feb 23 at 6:30-7:30 in the Oak Ballroom.

I’ve also written a little prediction of what I expect to hear on the Xuropa Blog. Who knows? Maybe the naysayers are right and EDA is Dead. Then again, maybe not. I, for one, am dying to find out which.

harry the ASIC guy

My Obligatory TOP 10 for 2009

Thursday, December 31st, 2009

2009 To 2010

http://www.flickr.com/photos/optical_illusion/ / CC BY 2.0

What’s a blog without some sort of obligatory year end TOP 10 list?

So, without further ado, here is my list of the TOP 10 events, happenings, occurrences, observations that I will remember from 2009. This is my list, from my perspective, of what I will remember. Here goes:

  1. Verification Survey - Last February, as DVCon was approaching, I thought it would be interesting to post a quickie survey to see what verification languages and methodologies were being used. Naively, I did not realize to what extent the fans of the various camps would go to rig the results in their favor. Nonetheless, the results ended up very interesting and I learned a valuable lesson on how NOT to do a survery.
  2. DVCon SaaS and Cloud Computing EDA Roundtable - One of the highlights of the year was definitely the impromptu panel that I assembled during DVCon to discuss Software-as-a-Service and Cloud Computing for EDA tools. My thanks to the panel guests, James Colgan (CEO @ Xuropa), Jean Brouwers (Consultant to Xuropa),  Susan Peterson (Verification IP Marketing Manager @ Cadence), Jeremy Ralph (CEO @ PDTi), Bill Alexander (VP Marketing @ Blue Pearl Software), Bill Guthrie (VP Marketing @ Numetrics). Unfortunately, the audio recording of the event was not of high enough quality to post, but you can read about it from others at the following locations:

    > 3 separate blog posts from Joe Hupcey (1, 2, 3)

    > A nice mention from Peggy Aycinena

    > Numerous other articles and blog posts throughout the year that were set in motion, to some extent, by this roundtable

  3. Predictions to the contrary, Magma is NOT dead. Cadence was NOT sold. Oh, and EDA is NOT dead either.
  4. John Cooley IS Dead - OK, he’s NOT really dead. But this year was certainly a turning point for his influence in the EDA space. It started off with John’s desperate attempt at a Conversation Central session at DAC to tell bloggers that their blog sucks and convince them to just send him their thoughts. For those who took John up on his offer by sending their thoughts, they would have waited 4 months to see them finally posted by John in his December DAC Trip report. I had a good discussion on this topic with John earlier this year, which he asked me to keep “off the record”. Let’s just say, he just doesn’t get it and doesn’t want to get it.
  5. The Rise of the EDA Bloggers.
  6. FPGA Taking Center Stage - It started back in March when Gartner issued a report stated that there were 30 FPGA design starts for every ASIC start. That number seemed very high to me and to others, but that did not stop this 30:1 ratio from being quoted as fact in all sorts of FPGA marketing materials throughout the year. On the technical side, it was a year where the issues of verification of large FPGAs came front-and-center and where a lot of ASIC people started transitioning to FPGA.
  7. Engineers Looking For Work - This was one of the more unfortunate trends that I will remember from 2009 and hopefully 2010 will be better. Personally, I had difficulty finding work between projects. DAC this year seemed to be as much about finding work as finding tools. A good friend of mine spent about 4 months looking for work until he finally accepted a job at 30% less pay and with a 1.5 hour commute because he “has to pay the bills”. A lot of my former EDA sales and AE colleagues have been laid off. Some have been looking for the right position for over a year. Let’s hope 2010 is a better year.
  8. SaaS and Cloud Computing for EDA - A former colleague of mine, now a VP of Sales at one of the small but growing EDA companies, came up to me in the bar during DAC one evening and stammered some thoughts regarding my predictions of SaaS and Cloud Computing for EDA. “It will never happen”. He may be right and I may be a bit biased, but this year I think we started to see some of the beginnings of these technologies moving into EDA. On a personal note, I’m involved in one of those efforts at Xuropa. Look for more developments in 2010.
  9. Talk of New EDA Business Models - For years, EDA has bemoaned the fact that the EDA industry captures so little of the value ($5B) of the much larger semiconductor industry ($250B) that it enables. At the DAC Keynote, Fu-Chieh Hsu of TSMC tried to convince everyone that the solution for EDA is to become part of some large TSMC ecosystem in which TSMC would reward the EDA industry like some sort of charitable tax deduction. Others talked about EDA companies having more skin in the game with their customers and being compensated based on their ultimate product success. And of course there is the SaaS business model I’ve been talking about. We’ll see if 2010 brings any of these to fruition.
  10. The People I Got to Meet and the People Who Wanted to Meet Me- One of the great things about having a blog is that I got to meet so many interesting people that I would never have had an opportunity to even talk to. I’ve had the opportunity to talk with executives at Synopsys, Cadence, Mentor, Springsoft, GateRocket, Oasys, Numetrics, and a dozen other EDA companies. I’ve even had the chance to interview some of them. And all the fellow bloggers I’ve met and now realize how much they know. On the flip side, I’ve been approached by PR people, both independent and in-house. I was interviewed 3 separate times, once by email by Rick Jamison, once by Skype by Liz Massingill, and once live by Dee McCrorey. EETimes added my blog as a Trusted Source. For those who say that social media brings people together, I can certainly vouch for that.

harry the ASIC guy

DAC Theme #1 - “The Rise of the EDA Bloggers”

Sunday, August 2nd, 2009

Harry Gries at Conversation Central

(Photo courtesy J.L. Gray

Last year, at the Design Automation Conference, there were only a couple dozen individuals who would have merited the title of EDA blogger. Of those, perhaps a dozen or so wrote regularly and had any appreciable audience. In order to nurture this fledgling group, JL Gray (with the help of John Ford, Sean Murphy, and yours truly) scrounged a free room after-hours in the back corner of the Anaheim Convention Center in which to hold the first ever EDA Bloggers Birds-of-a-Feather session. At this event, attended by both bloggers and traditional journalists, as John Ford put it, us bloggers got our collective butts sniffed by the top dog journalists.

My, how things have changed in just one year.

This year at DAC, us EDA bloggers (numbering 233 according to Sean Murphy) and other new media practitioners took center stage:

  • Bloggers were literally on stage at the Denali party as part of an EDA’s Next Top Blogger competition.
  • Bloggers were literally center stage at the exhibits, in the centrally located Synopsys booth, engaging in lively conversation regarding new media.
  • Atrenta held a Blogfest.
  • There was a Pavillion Panel dedicated to tweeting and blogging.
  • And most conspicuously, there was the 14-foot Twitter Tower streaming DAC related tweets.

Meanwhile, the traditional journalists who were still covering DAC seemed to fall into 2 camps. There were those who embraced the bloggers as part of the media and those that didn’t. Those that did, like Brian Fuller, could be found in many of the sessions and venues I mentioned above. Those that did not, could be found somewhere down the hall between North and South halls of Moscone in their own back corner room. I know this because I was given access to the press room this year and I did indeed find that room to be very valuable … I was able to print out my boarding pass on their printer.

Here’s my recap of the new media events:

I had mixed feelings regarding the Denali Top Blogger competition as I know others did as well. JL, Karen, and I all felt it was kind of silly, parading like beauty queens to be judged. Especially since blogging is such a collaborative, rather than competitive, medium. So often we reference and riff off of each other’s blog posts. Still, I think it was good recognition and publicity for blogging in EDA and one could not argue with the legitimacy of the blogger representatives, all first-hand experts in the areas that they cover. Oh, by the way, congratulations to Karen Bartleson for winning the award.

Conversation Central, hosted by Synopsys, was my highlight of DAC.  It was a little hard to find (they should have had a sign), located in a little frosted glass room on the left front corner of the Synopsys booth. But if you could find your way there, it was well worth the search. I’m a little biased since I hosted conversations there Monday - Wednesday on “Job Search: How Social Media Can Help Job Seekers & Employers”. The sessions were a combination of specific advice and lively discussions and debates. I was fortunate to have a recruiter show up one day and a hiring manager another day to add their unique perspectives. I think that that was the real power of this very intimate kitchen table style format. Everybody felt like they were allowed to and even encouraged to participate and add their views into the discussions. This is very different from a very formal style presentation and even panel discussions.

Unfortunately, I was not able to clone myself in order to attend all the sessions there, many of which I heard about afterwards from others or in online writeups. I did attend the session by Ron Ploof entitled “Objectivity is Overrated: Corporate Bloggers Aren’t Journalists, & Why They Shouldn’t Even Try”. Interestingly enough, no journalists showed up to the session. Still, it was a lively discussion, the key point being that bloggers don’t just talk the talk, they walk the walk, and therefore bring to the table a deeper understanding and experience with EDA and design than a journalist, even one that was previously a designer.

I also attended Rick Jamison’s session on “Competitors in Cyberspace: Why Be Friends?” which attracted several Cadence folks (Joe Hupcey, Adam Sherer, Bob Dwyer) and some Mentor folks. Although competitors for their respective companies, there was a sense of fraternity and a lot of the discussion concerned what is “fair play” with regards to blog posting and commenting. The consensus was that advocacy was acceptable and even expected from the partisans, as long as it could be backed up by fact and kept within the bounds of decorum (i.e. no personal attacks). EDA corporate bloggers have been very fair in this regards in contrast to some rather vitriolic “discussions” in other industries.

The Atrenta Blogfest sounded very interesting and I was very disappointed that I could not attend because it conflicted with my Conversation Central discussion. Mike Demler has a brief summary on his blog as does Daniel Nenni on his blog.

Late Wednesday, Michael Sanie hosted a DAC Pavillion Panel entitled “Tweet, Blog or News: How Do I Stay Current?” Panelists Ron Wilson (Practical Chip Design in EDN), John Busco (John’s Semi-Blog) and Sean Murphy (his blog) shared insights into the ways they use social media to stay current with events in the industry, avoid information overload, and separate fact from fiction. Ron Wilson commented that social networks are taking the place of the socialization that engineers used to get by attending conferences and the shared experience reading the same traditional media news. John Busco, the recognized first EDA blogger, shared how he keeps his private life and his job at NVidia separate from his blogging life. And Sean Murphy gave perspective on how blogging has grown within EDA and will continue to grow to his projection of 500 EDA bloggers in 2011.

Last, but not least, there was the Twitter Tower, located next to the Synopsys booth. Previous conferences, such as DVCon attempted to use hashtags (#DVCon) to aggregate conference related tweets. The success was limited, attracting perhaps a few dozen tweets at most. This time, Karen Bartleson had a better idea. Appeal to people’s vanity. The Twitter Tower displayed a realtime snapshot of all tweets containing “#46DAC“, the hashtag designated for the 46th DAC. If one stood in front of the tower and tweeted with this hastag, the tweet would show up within seconds on the tower. How cool is that? Sure it was a little gimmicky, but it made everyone who passed by aware of this new standard. As I write this, there have been over 1500 tweets using the #46DAC hashtag.

If you want to read more, Sean Murphy has done the not-so-glamorous but oh-so-valuable legwork of compiling a pretty comprehensive roundup of the DAC coverage by bloggers and traditional press. (Thanks Sean!)

harry the ASIC guy

EDA Is Only “Mostly Dead”

Wednesday, March 4th, 2009

Last Wednesday at DVCon, Peggy Aycinena MC’ed what used to be known as the Troublemakers Panel, formerly MC’ed by John Cooley. The topic, “EDA: Dead or Alive?” Well, having attended Aart’s Keynote address immediately preceding and having attended Peggy’s panel discussion, I can answer that question in the immortal words of Miracle Max, “EDA is only MOSTLY dead”. But first, some background.

Back in the mid 90s, I attended a Synopsys field conference where Aart delivered a keynote addressing the challenges of achieving higher and higher productivity in the face of increasing chip size. The solution, he predicted, would be design reuse in the form of intellectual property. Although most of us had only the faintest idea of what design reuse entailed and could barely fathom such a future, Aart’s prediction has indeed come true. Today, there is hardly a chip designed without some form of soft or hard IP and many chips are predominantly IP.

Some years later, he delivered a similar keynote preaching the coming future of embedded software. This was before the term SoC was coined to designate a chip with embedded processors running embedded software. Again, only a handful understood or could fathom this future, but Aart was correct again.

So, this year, immediately preceding Peggy’s Panel, Aart delivered another very entertaining and predictive keynote. After describing the current economic crisis in engineering terms using amplifiers and feedback loops, he moved to the real meat of the presentation which addressed the growing amount of software content in today’s SoCs. He described how project schedules are often paced by embedded software development and validation. How products are increasingly differentiated based on software, not hardware. And he predicted a day when chips would only have custom hardware to implement functions that could not be performed with programmable software. In essence, he described a future with little electronic design as we know it today, where hardware designers are largely replaced by programmers.

Immediately following Aart’s keynote was Peggy’s panel. (If you want to know exactly what occurred, there is no place better to go than Mike Demler’s blow-by-blow account.) Peggy did her best to challenge the EDA execs to defend why EDA would not die out. She kept coming back to that same question in different ways and the execs kept avoiding directly answering the question, choosing instead to offer such philosophical logic such as: “If EDA is dead, then semiconductors are dead. If semiconductors are dead, then electronics are dead. And since electronics will never die, EDA will never die”.

On the surface, logic such as this is certainly comforting. After all, who can imagine a future without electronics? Upon closer inspection, however, and in light of Aart’s keynote, there is plenty reason for skepticism.

Just as Aart was right about design reuse and IP…

Just as Aart was right about embedded software …

I believe that Aart is right about hardware design being replaced by software development.

As processors and co-processors become faster and more capable of handling tasks formerly delegated to hardware…

As time-to-market drives companies to sell products that can be upgraded or fixed later via software patches…

As fewer and fewer companies can afford the cost of chip design at 32nm and below…

More companies will move capabilities to software running on standard chips.

With that, what becomes of the current EDA industry. Will it adapt to embrace software as part of its charter. Or will it continue to focus on chip development.

Personally, I think Aart is right again. Hardware will increasingly become software. And an EDA industry focused on hardware, will be increasingly “mostly dead”.

harry the ASIC guy

Mentor Graphics Displaced Worker Program

Thursday, February 26th, 2009

I’m still up at the Design Verification Conference (DVCon) and have not had a chance to summarize last evening’s Software-As-A-Service and Cloud Computing EDA Roundtable. I will do that over the weekend and have a complete rundown next week, including slides.

In the meantime, I wanted to pass on some information that was announced a week or so ago and which I became aware of just this week. Mentor Graphics has initiated a Displaced Worker Program to provide free training to customers who have lost thier jobs in the last 6 months. Back last Decemeber I had issued a challenge to the EDA vendors to do just this. I don’t know if this challenge had any affect; hopefully they did this because they thought it was the right thing to do.

So far Mentor is the only company that has done this, to my knowledge. I’ve personally had discussions with one other of the “Big 3″, so hopefully they will follow suit. Maybe Mentor’s offer will help prompt them.

What do you think? Should they do this?

harry the ASIC guy

Update on SaaS/Cloud Roundtable & DVCon Day 1

Wednesday, February 25th, 2009

I’d like to update you on some new panel members for the SaaS and Cloud Computing EDA Roundtable and also give you some highlights from DVCon Day 1.

As previously reported, the roundtable will be held on Wednesday Feb 25th at 6:30pm in the Monterey/Carmel Rooms. We’ve picked up 2 additional panelists, Jean Brouwers and Bill Guthrie. Jean is an EDA industry veteran heavily into cloud computing and SaaS. Bill is Executive Vice President and Co-founder of Numetrics, a company that delivers its products using the SaaS model. This brings the total number of panelists to 7, so we should have many perspectives represented.

Here’s an update on DVCon Day 1:

Attendance at DVCon is down significantly this year. I don’t have exact numbers, but I’ve heard estimates on the order of half of last year. (Correction: By Day 3, there were 650 attendees which is ~80% of last year). Obviously the economy is a big factor. The exhibits session was probably 75% vendors and 25% attendees.

Lunch for approximately 150 attendees was sponsored by Accellera and included an overview of ongoing committee activities.and some informal polls on usage of Accleera standards. According to David Lin’s estimates OVL: 25%, UCIS: 40%, UPF: 10%, AMS: 2%, ITC: 5%, OCI: 2%, VHDL: 15%, SV: 80%, PSL: 10%. At one point the audience was asked how many had participated in the recent OVL survey and 1 person raised his hand.

I did not attend either the morning or afternoon tutorials due to work commitments in the morning and time spent at the exhibits in the afternoon. Some of the companies I spent time with include Gate Rocket, Achilles Test, and Synopsys. I’ll have some write ups on some of these visits shortly.

Finally, you can follow some of the live action on Twitter.

harry the ASIC guy

Setting The Record Straight

Thursday, February 19th, 2009

Since conducting the Verification Methodology Poll and publishing the raw results last week, I’ve been planning to follow up with a post that digs a little deeper into the numbers. Things have gotten rather busy in the meantime, both at work and with organizing the SaaS and Cloud Computing EDA Roundtable for next week at DVCon. So I’ve let it slip a little.

Well, I noticed today that the verification methodology poll was referenced in a Cadence blog post by Adam Sherer. The results were somewhat mis-interpreted (in my opinion), so that kicked my butt to post my own interpretations to set the record straight. Says Adam:

According to the poll conducted by Harry Gries in his Harry the ASIC Guy blog, you should go “all in” on the OVM because it is the 2:1 favorite.

In fact, the raw results had VMM with 80 users and OVM with 125 users, a ratio of just over 1.5:1 (1.5625 to be exact). So the 2:1 ratio is not accurate. However, if you add in RVM/Vera users to the VMM numbers, and then add in AVM, eRM, and e users to the OVM numbers, that ratio is more like 1.8:1. Closer, but still not 2:1.

It also indicates that my poll says that “you should go ‘all in’ on the OVM”. I never said that nor does the poll say anything about what you “should do”. The data simply captures what people are planning on using next. If you are inclined to follow the majority, then perhaps OVM is the way to go. By contrast, there is nothing in the poll comparing the technical merits of the various methodologies. So, if you are inclined to make up your own mind, then you have some work to do and my poll won’t help you on that. You’re probably better off visiting JL Gray at Cool Verification.

No poll is perfect and it will be interesting to compare to DVCon and John Cooley polls to see if they are consistent. Here are a few other interesting stats that I pulled out of the poll results:

  • 91% of respondents are using some sort of SystemVerilog methodology
  • 10% are using both OVM and VMM (although I suspect many of these are consultants)
  • 27% are still using e or Vera (more e than Vera)
  • 4% are using ONLY VHDL or Verilog (this number may be low due to the skew of respondents towards advanced methodologies)

Again, I welcome you to download the raw data, which you can find in PDF format and as an Excel workbook, and draw your own conclusions.

harry the ASIC guy

SaaS & Cloud Computing EDA Roundtable @ DVCon

Tuesday, February 17th, 2009

I’ve been writing about Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) and Cloud Computing as relates to EDA for some time now. Then back in January I made a New Years resolution to organize a SaaS EDA roundtable at the 2009 Design and Verification Conference (DVCon).  About a month ago I asked for volunteers and several of you have stepped up to help. Now, just a week before DVCon, I’d like to formally announce the event.

The SaaS and Cloud Computing Roundtable will be held from 6:30 - 8:00 pm on Wed Feb 25th in the Monterey/Carmel rooms at the San Jose Doubletree Hotel. This is immediately following the DVCon reception down the hall, so grab a drink and a bite and then wander on over.

SaaS and Cloud Computing are 2 of the hottest trends in the Information Technology and software industries. Some EDA companies have already put their toes in the water. This roundtable will explore the following question: Are they trailblazing the future of the industry or are they chasing an empty fad?

The format will consist of 5 brief (< 10 minute) presentations from people involved in various perspectives in SaaS and cloud computing for EDA:

This will be followed by an open, and hopefully lively, discussion.

I’m greatly looking forward to this event, especially since I get to collaborate with such a high-powered team and I have no idea what to expect. I truly believe that this could be one of the more interesting events at DVCon this year.

I hope to see many of you there.

harry the ASIC guy