Posts Tagged ‘Nusym’

A Tale of Two Booths - Certess and Nusym

Tuesday, June 10th, 2008

I had successfully avoided the zoo that is Monday at DAC and spent Tuesday zig-zagging the exhibit halls looking for my target list of companies to visit. (And former EDA colleagues, now another year older, greyer, and heavier). Interestingly enough, the first and last booths I visited on Tuesday seemed to offer opposite approaches to address the same issue. It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.

A well polished street magician got my attention at first at the Certess booth. After a few card tricks, finding the card I had picked out in the deck, he told me that it was as easy for him to find the card as it was for Certess to find the bugs in my design. Very clever!!! Someone must have been pretty proud they came up with that one. In any case, I’d had some exposure to Certess previously and was interested enough to invest 15 minutes.

Certess’ tool does something they call functional qualification. It’s kinda like ATPG fault grading for your verification suite. Basically, it seeds your DUT with potential bugs, then considers a bug “qualified” if the verification suite would cause the bug to be controlled and observed by a checker or assertion. If you have unqualified bugs (i.e. aspects of your design that are not tested), then there are holes in your verification suite.

This is a potentially useful tool since it helps you understand where the holes are in your verification suite. What next? Write more tests and run more vectors to get to those unqualified bugs. Ugh….more tests? I was hoping this would reduce the work, not increase it!!! This might be increasing my confidence, but life was so much simpler when I could delude myself that my test suite was actually complete.

Whereas the magician caught my attention at the Certess booth, I almost missed the Nusym booth as it was tucked away in the back corner of the Exhibit Hall. Actually, they did not really have a booth, just a few demo suites with a Nusymian guarding the entrance armed with nothing more than a RFID reader and a box of Twinkies. (I did not have my camera, so you’ll have to use your imagination). After all the attention they had gotten at DVCon and from Cooley, I was surprised that “harry the ASIC guy” could just walk up and get a demo in the suite.

(Disclaimer: There was no NDA required and I asked if this was OK to blog about and was told “Yup”, so here goes…)

The cool technology behind Nusym is the ability to do on-the-fly (during simulation) coverage analysis and reactively focused vector generation. Imagine a standard System Verilog testbench with constrained random generators and checkers and coverage groups defining your functional coverage goal. Using standard constrained random testing, the generators create patterns independent of what is inside the DUT and what is happening with the coverage monitors. If you hit actual coverage monitors or not, it doesn’t matter. The generators will do what they will do, perhaps hitting the same coverage monitors over and over and missing others altogether. Result: Lots of vectors run, insufficient functional coverage, more tests needed (random or directed).

The Nusym tool (no name yet) understands the DUT and does on-the-fly coverage analysis. It builds an internal model that includes all of the branches in your DUT and all of your coverage monitors. The constraint solver then generates patterns that try to get to the coverage monitors intentionally. In this way, it can get to deeply nested and hard to reach coverage points in a few vectors whereas constrained random may take a long time or never get there. Also, when you trigger a coverage monitor, it crosses it off the list and know it does not have to hit that monitor again. So the next vectors will try to hit something new. As compared to Certess, this is actually reducing the number of tests I need to write. In fact, they recommend just having a very simple generator that defines the basic constraints and focusing most of the energy on writing the coverage monitors. Result: Much fewer vectors run, high functional coverage. No more tests needed.

It sounds too good to be true, but it was obvious that these guys really believe in this tool and that they have something special. They are taking it slow. Nusym does not have a released product yet, but they have core technology with which they are working with a few customers/partners. They are also focusing on the core of the market, Verilog DUT, System Verilog Testbench. I would not throw out my current simulator just yet, but this seems like very unique and very powerful technology that can get coverage closure orders of magnitude faster than current solutions.

If anyone else saw their demo or has any comments, please chime in.

harry the ASIC guy

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Big DAC Attack

Tuesday, May 20th, 2008

OK … I’m registered to go to DAC for at least one day, maybe two. I’ll definitely be there on Tuesday and probably Wednesday evening for a Blogging “Birds-of-a-Feather” session that JL Gray is setting up. Besides hitting the forums and other activities, I’ll have about half a day to attack the exhibit floor or the “suites” to look at some new technology. If you want to meet up, drop me an email and we can arrange something.

Cadence won’t be there and I already talk to Synopsys and Mentor on a regular basis, so I’m planning on focusing on smaller companies with new technology. Here’s what’s on my list so far…

Nusym - They have some new “Path Tracing” technology that finds correlations between a constrained random testbench and hard-to-hit functional coverage points. With this knowledge, they claim to be able to modify the constraints to guide the simulation to hit the coverage points. The main benefit is in getting that last few % of functional coverage that can be difficult with unguided constrained random patterns.

Chip Estimate - Having been around for a few years and recently bought by Cadence, they are basically a portal where you can access 3rd party IP and use the information to do a rough chip floorplan. This allows you to estimate area, power, yield, etc. I’m real curious as to their business model and why Cadence bought them. At a minimum, it should be entertaining to see the hyper-competitive IP vendors present back-to-back at half hour intervals on the DAC floor.

I have a few others on my list, but there are so many small companies that it’s hard to go thru them all and decide what to see. That’s where I need your help.

What would you recommend seeing and why?